Archive for Greenleaf Classics

Greenleaf Classics House Style, c. 1969

Posted in Nightstand Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Sex Saucer People

Appropriated from Earl Kemp’s great e-zine, el. (If you’re into vintage sleaze, his memoirs are a must read of the times and people who wrote, edited, and published these books.)

Eliott - RogueNote that this is dated 1969 and states that “shock words” are okay to use, but not over-use.  By 69, court cases on censorship were allowing more dirty words in dirty books…ten, even seven, years before that, in the Nightstands and Midwoods and so on, from 1959-1963, you do not find any dirty words at all: “loins” for vaginas, breasts or bosoms rather than “tits” or “kncokers.”  In Silverberg’s “I was a Pornographer,” he notes that he qould freqently get a list of no-no words and terms from William Hamling and his editors, based on current court cases and what the cops were arresting for in the obscenity scare,  at one time forbidding the use of “give it to me,” which he found riduloulous so wrote a book with “give it to me” on almost very page (I think this was Roadhouse Girl, which I have yet to read and discuss, but soon..)

The writers out there will note that book length requirements were different back then than now — 47K to 67K words…today, most commercial publishers, even those that print erotica, do not want anything under 80K words (c. 300-325 manuscripts pages, coming out to printed books of 250-270 pages).  Harlequin still likes books in the 50-60K range (for those 192 page books); when I wrote for Blue Moon, my books ranged anywhere from a short 30K words to a normal 80K words, but average about 60K.  They never said otherwise; they never said anything was taboo, really, except “illegal” matters like rape and pedophilia and beastiality (more zoning laws in NY City when it came to obcenity than anything else).

In the meantime, for a blast from the past, I give you the…

HOUSE STYLE MANUAL
GREENLEAF CLASSICS, INC.
GUIDE FOR AUTHORS

Compiled and Edited by
PETER V. COOPER
Editor in Chief
Greenleaf Classics, Inc.
San Diego, California

Version dated 06-09-1969

#

I. MANUSCRIPT SPECIFICATIONS

A. Length: Regular adult novels & nonfiction-44,000 to 47,000 words;
Classics-50,000 and up;
Gay classics-63,000 to 66,000

B. Chaptering: Regular adult novels-exactly twelve, which may vary in length.
Other types-variable.
Chapters should be numbered, whether or not they bear titles. This matter should be centered at least six spaces above body copy.

C. Copy must be typewritten (pica or elite only), double-spaced on one side only of unlined 8- 1/2×11 white paper. (No erasable or corrasible bond, please.) Leave approximately 1-inch margins top, bottom and sides.

D. Use pencil only for corrections; ink markings hamper our editing process. Typing and page-numbering should be neat and accurate.

E. In fiction, we require strong emphasis on plot development and story ideas above all else, with a house taboo on irrelevant padding of any sort. The erotic content must be integral to characterization and story progression; it must be strong, meaningful and real.

In nonfiction (credentialed author or co-author preferred), we expect very specific case materials, with natural speech content, balanced by dignified scholarly commentary or narration.

F. We prefer sample chapter and outline, on new material only; we are not interested in examining old manuscripts. Report is within two weeks, and payment is on acceptance, with rate dependent on frequency of acceptance.

G. All submissions must be accompanied by sufficient return postage and self-addressed envelope. We assume no responsibility whatever for unsolicited manuscripts.

Ocean and LustII. STYLE GUIDE

A. Reference Works*

1. The American College Dictionary (ACD), C.L. Barnhart, Editor in Chief; Random House, 1963 to date.
2. 20,000 Words, Louis A. Leslie, McGraw-Hill, 1965.
3. The New Roget’s Thesaurus, Edited by Norman Lewis, Garden City Books, 1961.
4. Dictionary of American Slang, Wentworth and Flexner, Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1960.

*NOTE-These are standard reference volumes used in our editorial offices. We urge all authors to have copies of at least the first two, as our critiques may refer to information therein. 20,000 Words contains a section entitled “Punctuation Simplified” (pages 237-247), which is an invaluable guide.

B. Additional notes on punctuation and style

1. Brand Names: Avoid, otherwise watch spelling and caps, especially Coke (Coca-Cola), Jell-O, Levi’s (note apostrophe), Technicolor. But: diesel, quonset.

2. Capitalization: Generally, “down” style-a.m., p.m., summer, winter, etc.; the lieutenant (but Lieutenant Jones), the homicide division, the city, the state, the Taft building. If in doubt, check the ACD.

3. Commas and semicolons:
a. Read carefully pages 237-245 of 20,000 Words, with particular attention to the sections on apposition and nonrestrictive expressions.
b. In dialogue sequences, a comma must be used to separate attribution from following action (“Good-bye,” he said, and left), except in subordinate form (“Good-bye,” he said as he left).
c. Terms of address are always set off by commas, before and after.
“Henry, I wish you wouldn’t do that.”
“I asked you not to do that, dear.”
“Damn it, Henry, stop that right now!”

4. Dashes: Use two hyphens, no spacing in or around. (I think we-watch out!)
Indicates radical interruption: parenthetical interjection, midsentence thought shift, interrupted dialogue.

5. Ellipses: (…) Three dots only, no spacing in orAllison - playpussyaround. Indicates tapering off to silence, stuttering, breathy speech, pregnant pause.

6. Definitions: Know your meanings; be certain you mean what you say and vice versa. If in doubt, check the ACD. Especially watch fulsome, noisome, unique, and other such sneakies-strict definition use only. Do not use “oblivious to;” the correct form is “oblivious (forgetful) of.” Do not use “different than;” the correct form is “different (varying) from.”

7. Hyphenation: For general rules, see pg. 246, 20,000 Words. For special cases, check the attached word list. House rules: Good-looking (all-lookings), half-hearted, well-heeled, and all such “new meaning” combinations are hyphenated anywhere in sentence.

8. Italics: Use sparingly for word emphasis not given by context, for uncommon foreign words, for brief speechlike thoughts. Do not use for: “He said no.” “She said yes.”; nor for commonly borrowed foreign words (savoir faire, per se, fiancee, etc.); nor for long passages (three lines or more) of any sort. Always use for names of newspapers (the New York Times, the Gazette), magazines, books, ships, airplanes (but not for makes and models of ships, planes, autos): Lindbergh’s plane was called The Spirit of St. Louis. We flew on a Boeing 707.allison - for your sighs

9. Numbers: Small numbers (under 100) generally should be spelled out; larger ones may be written as numerals or spelled out, as writer prefers, but consistency must be maintained throughout the manuscript. (Particularly when stating times of day and characters’ ages). In dialogue, all numbers should be spelled out, as people do not speak in numerals. Note the following examples for general rules:
a. Three-thirty or 3:30; five-forty-five or 5:45; six o’clock or 6:00. Kill redundancies such as “at ten p.m. that night,” “at 12 midnight.”
b. A four-year-old, or a four-year-old boy, but four years old; a three-week vacation; but three weeks’ vacation.
c. One hundred forty-six (no and); Fifty-second Street (note caps); $5,000 (note comma).
d. Twenty dollars, but twenty-dollar bill; ten thousand dollars, but ten-thousand-dollar bills (unless there are ten bills of a grand each).
e. Height: Don’t use figures. Don’t abbreviate or use symbols for “inches” and “feet.”
f. Weight: Numerals or spelled out, but do not abbreviate the words “pounds” and “ounces.”

10. Possessives: In general, be sure you know the difference between possessives and plurals: possessives take apostrophes, plurals do not. (That is Mary’s book. Two Marys were invited to the party. This is my brother’s wife. Those are my sisters’ husbands.) Also watch the difference between possessives and contractions. (Whose book is that? I don’t know who’s at the door. That door is off its hinges. It’s about to fall down.) Our preference possessives ending in “s”: the boss’ daughter; Gonzales’ serape; the Joneses’ house (or, the Jones home); Willis’ wagon; but Bruce’s, Candace’s,Allison - Go Go SadistoDenise’s, etc.

11. Prefixes and Suffixes: “Half” is usually separate, except to form an adjective before a noun (note exceptions in word list). “Over” and “re” never take a hyphen unless necessary for clarity (okay are: overripe, reenter, reread, rework). “Ex”, “pseudo”, “quasi”, “self”, and “ultra” always take hyphens, “non” usually does; “like” usually needs no hyphen, “maker” usually does. (ex-husband, pseudo-intellectual, quasi-literate, self-esteem, ultra-modern, non-American, apelike, movie-maker) Also watch “ally” suffixes on such words as: accidentally, frantically, incidentally. When in doubt, check word list and ACD.

12. Quotes: Don’t use singles except inside doubles; for so-called effect, it’s: her “cousin” was, in fact, her lover. Punctuation goes outside quotation marks with one-word quotes only; two words or more, inside; of course, this does not apply to one-word comments in dialogue.

13. Spelled Sounds: Do not go to ridiculous extremes. In general, use these forms: aargh (pain); ah (one h), oh (one h); oh-oh (surprise); en? Hmm? Huh? Humph (doubt, scorn or indifference); mmm (delectation); uh-huh or mm-hmm (yes); uh-uh or unh-uh (no); uh (hesitation); psst, shh. Others, use your own judgment, but please don’t get carried away.

14. Spelling: See attached word list and the ACD. Always use American spellings, not British; color, favor, savor, etc.; caliber, fiber, luster, meager, somber, specter, theater, etc.; afterward, backward (one exception in word list), downward, forward, inward, outward, sideward, toward, upward; dialed, dialing, signaled, signaling, traveled, traveling, marveled, marveling, etc. (Usually, the “l” is doubled only when the emphasis falls on the last syllable, as in: propel, propelling.)Bellmore - Father in Lust

C. TABOO TERMS

Under current contemporary standards, adult fiction knows no restrictions as to word usage. However, please do not abuse this freedom of expression. There is no need to clutter up the manuscript with an overabundance of “shock words” in the narrative, simply to fill up space; use them only where appropriate. In fiction, we prefer use of slang terms to clinical terms in describing parts of the body and the actions in which they engage.

Do not use the following terms to describe anatomical parts (there is no need to be “cute” or evasive): his masculinity, his manhood, his avenger, her mammaries, her womanhood, her femininity.

To avoid tedious repetition of certain descriptive terms, refer to the Dictionary of American Slang or use your imagination-but again, don’t get too carried away.

Dexter - Sin VeltdD. PESTIFEROUS PAIRS

adverse: contrary; opposing in effect (seldom applied to persons)
averse: opposed; having an aversion

affect: (v.) to act on; to change; to impress; to influence
effect: (n.) result; (v.) to bring about

avert: turn aside (one’s eyes) or ward off (evil)
avoid: to keep away from, stay clear of, shun, evade

a while: a period of time
awhile: for a period of time

callous: (adj.) hardened; (v.) to become hard
callus: (n.) a hardened part of the skin

compose: to make up
comprise: to consist of; include

confidant: (n.) one in whom secrets are confided
confidante: (n.) feminine form of above word
confident: (adj.) certain, self-assured

discreet: prudent
discrete: separate

eminent: noted, prominent
imminent: impending
immanent: inherent

hangar: for airplanes
hanger: for clothes

its: possessive
it’s: contraction of it is

lay, laid, laid (transitive) to place or put
lie, lay, lain (intransitive) recline

lustful: libidinous
lusty: hearty

raise, raised, raised: (transitive) to elevate, to lift, to rear children
rise, rose, risen: (intransitive) to go up

repulse: to push away
revulse: to revolt or sicken

tortuous: twisting or complex
torturous: agonizing

principal: (adj.) chief, main (n.) central figure, basic debt, director of a school
principle: (n. always) a rule

rack: as a verb, strain or torture
wrack: noun only, meaning wreckage (flotsam or jetsam)

sensual: inclined to gratification of the senses; voluptuous
sensuous: of or pertaining to the senses; perceived by or affecting the senses

Elliott - Sns of SeenaE. WORD FAT-a few common excessive forms to be reduced:

supposing = suppose (This is an imperative verb form: a sentence begun with it should end with a period.)

her own, his own = her, his (unless clarity compels)

excepting = except; off of = off; or from; a ways = a way

the both of them, or the two of them = both, they, or them

Go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go! = Go, do, go! (Three will suffice at any time for any word or sound being repeated as a chant, shout, etc.)

Excess repetition of that girl, the man, the blonde, etc., once the characters’ names are known to the reader

Excess repetition of characters’ full names (except for special emphasis)

Excess use of bare, nude, naked, etc., once the condition is obvious, or as in: “He reached inside her blouse and bra to touch her naked breast.” Or, after an undressing scene, the completely unnecessary statements: “Then they were naked,” “Then he was as bare as she was,” etc.

Totally unnecessary use of “a pair of,” “two”, “both”, “Twin”, etc., in reference to breasts, arms, legs, buttocks, etc.

Unnecessary use of “of her” and “of him” to show possession, as in: “The breathtaking loveliness of her,” “the strength of him.” Should be: “her breathtaking loveliness,” “his strength,” etc.

Elliott  Carnal CageIII. WORD LIST

Compiled by our editors from notes on most frequently misspelled words in manuscripts. (Asterisks denote departure from ACD form, indicating house preferences.) For all words not listed, use the first form given in the ACD.

abdomen
accommodate
acknowledgment, acknowledgeable, acknowledging
acquaintance
advertise, advertisement, advertiser, advertising
aggressor, aggressive
aerial
afterward
air-condition (er, ed, ing)
airline*
all right (never alright)
any more (never anymore)
any place (always)
any time (always
ash tray
attendant
aureole
baby-sitter*
backward (direction)
backwards (in reverse order)*
ballpoint pen*
barbecue
beeline
blond (masc., noun & adj.)
blonde (fem., noun & adj.)
blue jeans
bourbon (no cap)
bourgeois
boy friend
brand-new
brassiere (bra is okay)
brief-case* (but attaché case)
cab driver
cafe (no accent)*
camouflage  Shaw - Corrupted
Canadian whisky (no e)
caress
cave man (n.), cave-man (adj.)
cellmate*
chaise longue (but lounge chair)
cheekbone* (but collar bone, etc.)
Chris-Craft
coiffeur (hair stylist)
coiffure (hairdo; coiffed, adj.)
coolly
cross-eyed (but cockeyed)
Chevy
cross-town (all forms)
damn, damned, damn it, damnedest
daytime
defense
desirable
desperate
diesel* (no cap)
dinner time, lunch time, supper time
discreetly (prudently)
discretely (separately)
disheveled
disk
double-cross (verb)
double-crosser, double-crossing
double cross (noun only)
drug store
dumfounded (no b)
ear lobe
ecstasy
embarrass (ed, ing, ment)
everyday (adj. only)
exaggerate
exhilarated
existence
fierce
fiery (never firey)
fingertip*Shaw - Tramp
focus, focused, focusing
G-string*
garter belt
guage (estimate-never gage)
gouge (to scoop out)
girl friend
glamorous (but glamour)
goddamn, goddamn it, goddamnedest*
good-bye*
good night (but good-night kiss; said their good-nights)Shaw - Tramp 2
good will (n.), good-will (adj.)
goosepimples*, gooseflesh*
half-day, half-dollar, half-hour, half-mile (but half an hour, etc.)
half slip
halfway (adj. & adv.)
half-wit
hangover* (but hung-over)
harass
hardhead (n.), hard-headed (adj.)
hard-top
hatbox
headwaiter
heartache
heartbreak (all forms)
hi-fi
hitchhike
hors d’oeuvres
idiosyncrasy
indefinable
inside out (hyphenate before a noun)
insistent
intern (n.), interne (f.)
irresistible
jack hammer
jackknife (n. & v.), jackknifed
jeopardyElliott - Decadent
judging, judgment
Juggernaut (note cap)
kidnaped (one p, all forms)
knowledgeable
languor, languorous
lascivious
leisure
Lesbian, Lesbianism (always cap)*
Lez, Lezzie (never use Les, Lessie)
leveled (one l, all forms)
libidos (pl.)
lieutenant (cap only before or as a name)
living room
loathe, loathsome
loveliness
lovemaking (no hyphen)
love play
lovesick
ludicrous
luster, lustrous
ma’am or madame (polite term of address)*
madam (one who runs a house, not a home)
machine gun (n.), machine-gun (adj. & v.)
machine-gunned, machine-gunner
make-up (all forms except verb), ditto made-up
mealtimeElliott - Untamed
mid-air
midsection*
mid-town
murmur
mustache (never mou–)
nearby (adj. & adv.)
Negro, Negroes
negligee (no accent)
night club, night spot
nickel (metal & coin)
nighttime
occur, occurrence, occurred, occurring
okay (never O.K.)
old-fashioned
paneled (one l, all forms)
panty girdle
paraphernalia
passed (verb form)
past (adj., adv., or prep.)
Peeping Tom (note caps)
per cent (but percentage)
persevere, perseverance
plainclothesman*
playroom
pickup (Elliott - Instructorn. & adj.), pick up (v.)
pile driver
pill box
point-blank
practice (all forms)
prestige
precede, preceded
proceed, proceeded
protuberant
recur, recurred, recurrent, etc.
redhead (n.), red-headed (adj.)
right side up (hyphenate before nouns)
schoolboy, schoolgirl, schoolteacher
scorch
Scotch whisky (no e)
seafood*
seize
separate (v. or adj.)
servant
setup (n.), set up (v.)
shined (polished), shone (gave light)
short wave (all forms)
sibilantElliott - Man Collector
siege
signaled (one l, all forms)
sledge hammer (n.), sledge-hammer (adj.)
smolder (no u)
solely
some place (never someplace)
soundproof, soundproofed
sports coat (jacket, shirt, car, etc.)
strip tease (but strip-teaser, -tease act)
superintendent
supersede
sweatshirt*
T-shirt*
temperament, temperamental
teen-age, teen-ager (always hyphenated)
tendency
terry cloth (n. & adj.)
theater
thrash (only farmers thresh)
titillate
tousle, tousled
toward
towhead (n.), tow-headed (adj.)
tranquil, tranquilizer, tranquillity
trench coat
trip hammer*
truck driver
TV (always caps, no periods or space)
unselfconscious (but self-conscious)
upside down (hyphenate before nouns)
vice president
weekend* (all forms)
will powerNightstand - Tormented
weird
whiskey (all except Scotch and Canadian)
wield
worshiped (one p, all forms)
worthwhile* (all forms)
wrist watch
yield
zigzag (all forms)

Motel Sex Club/The Wild Ones by Andrew Shaw (Lawrence Block)

Posted in Nightstand Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Shaw - Motel Sex Club

A Lawrence Block-penned Adrew Shaw novel — has Block’s tell-tale clipped noir style. A fast read with short chapters that feels like Block wrote this in several days.

A prevelent theme in 60s sleaze is the sex club — suburban swappers, college sex clubs, wild teens — this is a wild teens sesx club.  A 17 year old girl runs the family motel outside Syracuse while her dad is away for the summer; she soon invites all her friends from college for partiesand sex romps, and sleeps with traveling salesmen and any other men who fancy her delight.

Motel guests sleep with each other, not knowing each other’s names — the set-ups are absurd and more like Debbie Does Dallas situations.

There are wild parties with pot, drifting into reefer madness.  The night they all drop LSD, things go nuts…well, in Motel Sex Club, 1960, it’s speed pills…in The Wild Ones, the 1973 reprint, it’s been updated to acid — the language is updated too: “tits” for breasts” and “fuck me” for “give it to me.”

Not Block’s best, not as good as Lust Damned.

Shaw - The Wild Ones

Don Elliott Nightstand Lust Titles

Posted in Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , on May 18, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Elliott - Lust CultElliott - Lust LordElliott -Lust Market

elliotyt - lust sprere

SIN!

Posted in Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , on May 8, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Elliott -- Sin BaitElliott - Sin BinElliott - Sin CrazedElliott - Sns of Seenaelliott sinful onesExpense Account SinnersSin WarpedSin Curcuit

Sin Kin

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