Archive for July, 2009

The Books of Dr. Garth Mundinger-Klow

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on July 31, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Rader girl

Be sure to check out The Olympia Press books by Dr. Garth Mundinger-Klow, son of sexologists Guenter Klow and Gerda Mundinger.

His blog is here.

Anything Goes by Robert Carney (Newsstand Library, 1961) and Lust Farm by J.X. Williams (Harry Whittington) (Ember Books, 1964)

Posted in Nightstand Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 28, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Anything GoesI got this one because Feral House used the Robert Bonfils art for the cover of Sin-A-Rama, so I was curious about the book — as in, was the story as good as the “water baby” theme art (that Bonfils also uses for Don Elliott’s Lust Queen, soon on my reading list).

Elliott - Lust Queensinarama

Boy was I pleasantly surprised.  This is a great little novel, a lost gem in the blackhole of sleaze paperback publishing….take out sleaze, I would not call this novel “sleaze” per se…it is a hardboiled tale of a guy who has gotten himself into a few tangles in Los Angeles and is trying to wiggle out.

I have no idea who Robert Carney is — Sin-A-Rama calls him “Robert H. Carney” who used a pen name, Herbert Roberts, from what I can tell one novel, Mardi (on my list). The only other Robert H. Carney books I can find is a non-fiction title about the Atlanta Times.  There is a Robert H. Carney in Atlanta on Facebook who seems the right age to have written this 1961 novel…maybe it is him and this is not a another pen name who Whomever.

Carney is influenced by Nathaniel West, but there’s also some James Cain and Jim Thompson tossed in there.  The prose is lean, mean, and to the point.

Joey Allen is a used car salesman whose former partner destroyed their business by gambling, then killing himself.  Joey wants to be rich.  He is sleeping with three women and trying to keep them from each other — a former fiance he has dumped, a new fiance whose father owns used car lots all over California, and the bosses new, young, hot wife, who hates her fat rich husband and his spoiled daughter, and has a plan for getting Joey to committ murder, promising him the car business, money, and her sleek slender body.

Like any good hardboiled Los Angeles story, there’s plenty of drinking, sex, violence, colorful characters, Malibu, and Hollywood smog.

Finding these great lost novels is fun — it’s also depressing to think they are lost, and a book like this was not re-discovered by, say, Black Lizard, the way Harry Whittington’s noirs were.

Williams - Lust Farm

Harry Whittington was a pulp writer who penned in many genres, but is best known for hardboiled crime and nurse romances (I will talk about his The Young Nurses at some point, as well as more of his Greenleafs).  Lynn Munroe recently put together a catalogue and narraitive of his search for Whittington’s softcore:

In 1986, the prolific “king of the paperbacks” Harry Whittington (1915-1989) wrote an essay about his writing career entitled “I Remember It Well” for Black Lizard Books. Black Lizard used it as an introduction to the 1987-88 reprints of six classic hardboiled crime stories, originally published by Gold Medal and others. In that piece, Whittington revealed this:

“ I signed, in 1964, to do a 60,000-word novel a month for a publisher under his house names. I was paid $1000. On the first of each month. I wrote one of these novels a month for 39 months.”

These 39 unknown books became “the missing 39” for Whittington collectors.

These “missing” books were published under house names J.X. Williams and the ever-prolific John Dexter, and Curt Colman later on, ranging from crime, romance, office, and hardboiled themes.  Lynn Munroe notes:

John Dexter and J.X. Williams are well-known house names used by many different authors, but Curt Colman is a more obscure name. No one I’ve talked to, including Colman’s editor Earl Kemp, knew who Curt Colman was. Only eleven of this publisher’s books are credited to Curt Colman, and seven of those were in the box in Whittington’s house. It was a safe bet to look at the remaining four Curt Colman titles, and all four of them proved to be written by Harry Whittington.

Kemp did not know who Colman was since the manuscripts were coming from the Scott Meredith Agency, true identitfies hidden. Plus it seems Whittington’s wife did not approve of these books by her prolific husband, and Whittington kept them secret until after his passing.

The first was Lust Farm, as J.X. Williams, with (again) a Robert Bonfils cover; it is another James Cain/Jim Thompson infuenced story set in the Detroit farmlands.  Cora has escaped her brutal criminal thug boyfriend from Chicago, but he finds her in a small town working as a waitress.  She “accidentally” kills him and goes on the run.  In another town, as a waitress, dodging men, she meets a 50-year-old farmer, Aaron, and marries him.  She’s 22.  She figures she can lead a safe, quiet life as a farmer’s wife.

Here is Lynn Munroe’s review:

We tend to think of “backwoods” stories taking place in some hillbilly hollow or in the deep South, but LUST FARM takes place in Michigan. Not in any city, but out in a rural setting near a little town called Cold River, down the highway from Lansing. There is no such town in Michigan, but there is a real town on that highway called Coldwater, and LUST FARM is certainly set there. Small town waitress Cora Barnes has a secret. She has fled her previous life, killing the Jack Daniels-guzzling sadist Tony and stealing a package of his money. A kind farmer named Aaron Barr marries her and takes her out to the country to live on his farm. When his college-age foster son Caleb comes home from University up the highway at East Lansing, it’s lust at first sight for Cora and Caleb. Then someone disappears and the local sheriff comes out to the farm and starts asking questions. With names like Aaron and Caleb, LUST FARM reminds us of an Old Testament tale like EAST OF EDEN.

The three on the farm are reminiscent of the trio in Jim Thompson’s CROPPER’S CABIN. Even though it is set in Michigan, the farmers behave more like sharecroppers in Whittington’s DESIRE IN THE DUST than like Yankees. This is Whittington country, not Steinbeck’s or Thompson’s.

I will be reading more books by Whittington…

The Drifter by March Hastings (Midwood)

Posted in Midbook Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 27, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Drufter

I plan to write a bit of a lengthy discussion of March Hastings as I read more of her books.  My first was Duet by Laura Duchamp, that I have discussed here.  Hastings and Duchamp were the pen names of a writer named Sally M. Singer, who was a bonafide lesbian writing about bi-sexuality and lesbians, rather than a man writing them. Under her own name and as Amelia Jamison, she seems to have written some gothics, romances, and others, seen here.

At Lynn Munroe’s site, he tried to reach her for an interview but seems she had disappeared in obscurity, not wishing to discuss her days as a softcore writer.

In lesbian pulp lore, her most famous novel is Three Women, which has been reprinted by both Niad Press and Cleis Press as lesbian classics. In 2000, the Quality Paperback Bookclub issued Three Women back-to-nack with another lesbian classic, Women’s Barracks.Women's Barracks

private hellFor collectors, Hastings’ Her Private Hell is always priced around $100 of more, mainly for the Paul Rader cover, but Rader did many of her books, such as the first edition of The Drifter (above). The second edition has a photo-cover of a woman next to a piano player, with a jazzy slum feel — I prefer the Rader cover (beats me why Midwood would change a great cover to a not-so-great cover).

Glancing through the Hastings novels I have — Fear of Incest, A Rage Within, Obsession, Crack-Up, Barbie — and the Laura Duchamp books (I’m not sure if she had other pen names, probably, as she wrote for a number of companies), Sally Singer focused on the world of the wealthy and rich and their psyco-sexual probelms.  The women are often married to men who are sadists, impotent, or just “wrong” — and they often find solace in the arms of another woman, an oft-use set-up for vintage lesbian stories.

Her writing is amazingly good, far too good for “sleaze.”  I previously stated that Joan Ellis wrote elegant dirty books; March Hastings ups the ante, and is on par with Joyce Carol Oates’s 1960s work.  Her prose is smooth, her dialogue top notch, her charcters and their situations believable, if we want to believe the angsts of the upper crust of society.

In The Drifter, a woman named Dina has made an error in marriage —  her husband, Emil, is impotent, and only likes to watch her masturbate while he looks at a photo of his sister, whom Dina resembles.  He is also mentally cruel.  After a month of marriage, she leaves him and runs to Jeff, a rich ex-boyfriend on Long Island whom she has had an on-and-off relationship with for many years.

At Jeff’s house (or mansion, with servants),  she meets Lauren, a lesbian, and has an encounter, and becomes confused, thinking she loves Lauren and has always been gay, while Jeff wants to marry her when her marriage is annulled and Emil is hunting her down, revenge on his agenda.

She hides in a sleazy Harlem boarding house (hence the cover) and drinks her pain away,  where an old family friend, a “cousin,” rapes her, and she realzies he had been raping her alcoholic mother in the past.  Dina doe snot come from money, she came from the slums, and only mingles wth the idle rich via Jeff.

She also gets raped by a bull-dyke lez.

For all her sexual sins, she feels she deserves this.

There is a happy ending, of course: as she has a talk with Lauren and realizes she is not a lesbian, really, and she makes plans to marry Jeff, after Jeff pays off Emil a million dollars to agree to an annullment.

Recommended for a good, language-rich read.

I look forward to reading and discussing other Hasings and Duchamp novels as I get to them…

Hastings - 3rd Theme Hastings - Abnormal Wife

Hasings - Twilight Sex Hastings - fear of incest

Hastings - Circle of SinHastings - ShameHastings - Jealous and Free

Hastings - Savage Surrender

Hastings - veil of torment Hastings - Unashamed

Hastings - Three Women Hastings - Enraptured

Hastings - Chico Women Hastings - Whip of Desire

Convention Girl by Don Elliott (Robert Silverberg) — Nightstand Books #1547

Posted in Don Elliott, Nightstand Books, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , on July 26, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Elliott - Convention Girl

This one is a little different from the other Silverberg Don Elliotts — more mature, dark, without the sappy romantic endings that he sometimes uses.  Let’s say this books has one heck of a depressing ending, with three dead bodies.

It is NB #1547, the 46th book William Hamling published — Silverberg wrote the first one, Love Addict, that I have already discussed.  This was perhaps at a dozen titles Silverberg had written — plus a John Dexter or Sin Girlstwo, and Sin Girls as Marlene Longman (a pen name later to be used by Marion Zimmer Bradley for The Twisted Ones).

Dan Holestein is in the “small home contracting business.”  He’s worked hard and is successful, has his own company and employees, lives well.  His wife, however, is frigid and cold, so he sometimes turns to other women, like “convention girls” when he goes out of town for conventions.

It seemed fitting to read Convention Girl while at the San Diego Internatinal ComicCon this weekend, since at the “Con” there are always calls girls working the hotels bars.

A convention girl, for 1960, is another form of call girl, hooker, whore.  Young women go to hotel suite parties and entertain. They are called hostesses, and sometimes they hock product, or just stand around looking good.  We’ve all seen them at conventions, film festivals, whatever — I have.  Even at comic book conventions, where hookers have told me they make good money.

In Cincinatti, Holstein meets Judy.  She’s 22, he’s 42.  He falls in love and so does she, so she says.  Here is where the book cover doesn’t get it right — Judy is jet black straught hair and a deep tan, whereas the female on the cover has red hair and pale skin.  Go figure.

So Holstein convinces her to leave Cincinatti and move to New York City, where he will set her up in an apartment and give her money — a mistress/kept woman situation.  She goes for it.  He says he will divorce his wife and marry her.

He goes to her on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.  he can never sepnd the night unless he tells his wife he had to go out of town.  Judy is bored — he doesn’t know it at first, but she gets back into the convention girl biz to have something to do at night.  She doesn’t need money, he gives her money.  She needs “kicks.” But he is starting to have doubts, she being 2o years younger, and how he is getting to be an old man…

There is one sex scene that uses dialogue to describe a hand job/finger fuck moment betwenn the two.  It reminded me if the sex-against-a-tree scene in Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, told in dialogue with hints…I am certain that Silverberg was nodding his head to the Hemingway influence:

“There. That’s better, isn’t it?” she asked.

“Lots better.” [he said]

“Stay still. Don’t move.”

“Okay.”

“Hold me here.”

“You like that, do you?”

“Very very much,” she said. “That’s right,” she said a moment later. “Slowly. Don’t rush it. Slow. Keep doing it that way.  Yes, Dan. Yes, that’s it. Just like that.”

“I love you.”

“I love you too, Dan.  Here. Hold me.”

“Lift up a little.”

“Okay?”

“Okay.”

For minute after dizzying minute, Holstein gripped her while she performed incredible acrobaics beneath him…

For oral sex, there’s “kiss me there” or “he kissed her loins gently.”

He knows his wife will  not grant a divorce, or take half his wealth, so he plots to murder her.  But after he kills her, making it look like suicide, he finds out that Judy has been whoring, and he loses his mind and…

Reed Nightstand reprinted the book in 1973 as The Man Collector.  The girl on the cover looks more like Judy is described…

Elliott - Man Collector

Love Addict by Don Elliott (Robert Silverberg) Nightstand Books #1501

Posted in Nightstand Books, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Love Addict
loveaddict_1959

This novel has some historical significance in sleaze book publishing, for Nightstand/Greenleaf/Cornith/Blake Pharms, and even in science-fiction history.  Love Addict is Robert Silverberg’s first book for Nightstand, and the first Nightstand, William Hamling’s foray into softcore novels — some will contend it was Harlan Ellison’s idea, although Ellison seems to have divorced himself from his contribution to sleaze publishing — not only did he seem to commission and edit this novel from sexgang1Silverberg (paying him $600, with a $200 bonus when it went into a2nd printing), Ellison wrote the third Nightstand, Sex Gang, a collection of stories that is now a hard-to-find and much sought after collectior’s item, going for $500-800 on the market — hell, a month ago I was bidding on a very poor, falling apart copy on eBay, and someone else got it for $198.

Love Addict is also rare, at least the first printing, but I got my hands on a second priting (1959 edition, Reed Nightstand later re-issued it as a regular-sized mass market ppbk in 1973, see above) for $33.

Silverberg had a previous relationship with William Hamling — he had a $500/month contract to provide text for Hamling’s Imagination, a SF pulp…that went away when the SF market dried up in the mid-1950s.  Harlan Ellison was an editor for Hamling’s Rogue Magazine, a men’s slick compeeting with Playboy.  In “My Life as a Pornographer,” Silverberg explains it:

I was 24 years old when I stumbled, much to my surprise, into a career of writing sex novels. I was then, as I am now, primarily known as a science-fiction writer. But in l958, as a result of a behind-the-scenes convulsion in the magazine-distribution business, the whole science fiction publishing world went belly up. A dozen or so magazines for which I had been writing regularly ceased publication overnight; and as for the tiny market for s-f novels (two paperback houses and one hardcover) it suddenly became so tight that unless you were one of the first-magnitude stars like Robert Heinlein or Isaac Asimov you were out of luck.

I had been earning a very nice living writing s-f since my graduation from college a few years earlier. I had a posh five-room apartment on Manhattan’s exclusive West End Avenue ($l50 a month rent – a fortune then!), I had fallen into the habit of spending my summer vacations in places like London and Paris, I ate at the best restaurants, I was learning something about fine wines. And suddenly two thirds of the magazines I wrote for were out of business, with a slew of older and better-established writers competing for the few remaining slots.

Robert Silverberg and Harlan Ellison in 1960.

But I was fast on my feet, and I had some good friends. One of them was Harlan Ellison, a science-fiction writer of my own age, who – seeing the handwriting on the wall in the science fiction world – had left New York to accept a job in Chicago as editor of Rogue, an early men’s magazine that was trying with some success to compete with its cross-town neighbor, Playboy. (Penthousedidn’t yet exist, in those far-off days.) The publisher of Rogue was William L. Hamling, a clean-cut young Chicago suburbanite whose first great love, like Harlan’s and mine, had been science fiction. Bill Hamling had published an s-f magazine called Imagination, which bought one of my first stories in l954. From l956 on, he had paid me $500 a month to churn out epics of the spaceways for him on a contract basis. Now, though, Imagination was gone, and Hamling’s only remaining publishing endeavor was his bi-monthly girlie magazine.

Ellison RogueHarlan, soon after going to work for him, convinced Bill that the future lay in paperback erotic novels. Hamling thought about it for about six minutes and agreed. And then Harlan called me.


“I have a deal for you, if you’re interested,” he said. “One sex novel a month, 50,000 words. $600 per book. We need the first one by the end of July.” It was then the beginning of July. I didn’t hesitate. $600 a month was big money in those days, especially when you were a young writer at your wits’ end because all your regular markets had crashed and burned. One book would pay four months rent. They were going to publish two paperbacks a month, and I was being offered a chance to write half the list myself. “You bet,” I said. By the end of July Harlan had Love Addict – a searing novel of hopeless hungers, demanding bodies, girls trapped in a torment of their own making, et cetera, et cetera. (I’m quoting from the jacket copy.)

Elliott - Gang GirlBill Hamling loved Love Addict. By return mail came my six hundred bucks and a request for more books. I turned in Gang Girl in September. I did The Love Goddess in October. Later that month I wrote Summertime Affair also. Two novels the same month? Why not? I was fast, I was hungry, I was good.

In October, also, the first two Nightstand Books went on sale – mine and something called Lust Club, by another young writer who also was making a quick adaptation to changes in his writing markets. His book, like mine, was really pretty tame stuff. What we were writing, basically, were straightforward novels of contemporary life, with very mild interludes of sexual activity every twenty or thirty pages. But the characters actually did go to bed with each other, and we did try to describe what they were doing and how they felt in as much detail as the government would allow.

You can read the entire text here at Earl Kemp’s el.

Challon - Campus LobveSilverberg’s essay seems to indicate that Love Addict was his fisrt forway into softcore, but he had been publishing books with Bedside all through 1959 — seven as David Challon and five as Mark Ryan (as far as I can tell), most published in 1959.  Love Addict was written in July 1959 and published in Ocober, so Silverberg was a busy guy, typing away.  Also, Silverberg makes it look like he was approached to write, although Earl Kemp, in “Have Typewriter, Will Whore for Food,” it was Silverberg’s idea to have Ellison pitch a Bedstand-like series to Hamling:

In New York City, popular young science fiction writer Robert Silverberg discovered Bedside Books. At that point in time (1959), Silverberg had already acquired a serious case of Compulsive Writeritus and was looking for new markets to conquer. Bedside Books looked like a natural. In short order Silverberg was selling them manuscripts that appeared under the bylines of David Challon and MarkRyan - Company GirlRyan. The new market direction could be the answer to many writers’ wildest dreams in the very near future.

Harlan Ellison, along with his wife Charlotte, was preparing to move to Evanston, Illinois, to work for William Hamling. Silverberg approached Ellison with the glorious possibilities for the future for energetic young writers and had him all primed and ready for William Hamling so Ellison could lay out the road map to Toontown in front of him.

Everyone thought Ellison was in Evanston to work on Rogue, Hamling’s Playboy-type men’s magazine. Even Harlan thought so at times, and talked about it incessantly, thereby furthering his modest reputation….

Hamling liked the idea of the proposed books and grasped the concept of the throwaway sleazy paperback firmly in his hands. After a bit of formulation, Hamling sent Ellison back to New York City to start the ever-loving money-making wheels in motion.

Harlan Ellison went straight to Robert Silverberg to report on his success with Hamling in the initial set-up phase of the operation. It was Silverberg, not Ellison, who took the proposal to Scott Meredith that eventually opened the doors to the fabled black box clandestine enterprise that virtually flooded the country with soft-core pornography.

I could even stretch the point just a little and say that it was Robert Silverberg that made me what I am today.

So, basically, Harlan Ellison and Robert Silverberg started the ball rolling of what is now canonical history in publishing, freedom of speech, obscenity and censorship lawsuits and criminal court cases, and now a niche collectors realm.

Earl Kemp continues:

Nightstand Books, blatantly patterned after Bedside Books, produced its premier volume, NB1501,Love Addict, by Don Elliott (Robert Silverberg). It also featured what would become a trademark of the earlier Nightstands, a stylized Harold W. McCauley cover painting using flat backgrounds and pastel colors. The McCauley paintings with their heavy emphasis upon sexy women set the style for all the early-on Blake Pharmaceuticals publications. NB1503 was Sex Gang, by Paul Merchant (Harlan Ellison). Both books carried the cover price of 50 cents.

In the beginning those books appeared under the imprint of Nightstand Books. Two titles were published every month by a company named Blake Pharmaceuticals in Evanston, Illinois. Blake Pharmaceuticals was a defunct Illinois corporation that was purchased cheaply by William Hamling. Illinois corporate law, at the time, required three legal Illinois residents to become a corporation. Blake Pharmaceuticals’ three ex-coworkers from the Ziff-Davis Chicago era were William L. Hamling, Raymond A. Palmer, and Richard S. Shaver. Only thing was, Palmer was a legal resident of Amherst, Wisconsin and Shaver lived even further north in Wisconsin.

Producing Nightstand Books turned out to be more work than Harlan Ellison had originally expected to be involved with while operating Blake Pharmaceuticals. So much so that, in early 1960, Harlan quit and returned to New York City. He did, however, continue to write cover blurbs for the books from there for a long time, at $45. per blurb. For a while, it was Harlan’s major source of income

Another co-worker from those glorious Ziff-Davis days, the Amazing and Fantastic cover artist Harold W. McCauley, was also close at hand. Since the company moved to New York, McCauley had been doing lots of artwork for Coca-Cola, creating that fantastic looking virginal girl next door…and an occasional Santa Claus…that adorned many of the Coca-Cola billboards worldwide. During the era of Hamling’s Imagination andImaginative Tales, McCauley painted numerous covers for them as well. He would soon be called into action once more.

Once reincorporated, Hamling redirected Blake Pharmaceuticals into publishing pornography and Harlan Ellison was running the whole show while seemingly running Rogue instead. In those days, in spite of the popular acceptance of soft-core pornography in movie theaters all across the country, an operation like Blake Pharmaceuticals was at the very least frowned upon and was kept, as much as possible, completely under cover.

Toss out the half dozen rather tame sex scenes, Love Addict is an urban novel about a serious drug addiction in the 1950s: heroin, also known as H, horse, junk.  It is also a doomed love story.

Jim Holman is an engineer in the middle of a bad divorce.  Pissed after leaving his wife’s lawyer’s office, Holman stops off at a Brooklyn jazz club to have a few drinks; there is is mesmerized the 22-year-old woman singing with the band, Helene Raymond.  He talks to her, convinces her to let him drive her home…she keeps warning him that she will hurt him, she is no good. She tells him she’s a junkie, and shows him the needle marks on her thigh.  She says she has been off junk for three months but knows she will relapse.  He doesn’t care; he’s in love…

Problem: the band leader is an ex-boyfriend since she was 17.  She has broken it off but he’s possessive and does not like her dating and sleeping with this older man (Holman is 29).  Helene is manic and goes back on heroin, that her ex-boyfriend is happy to supply.

Holman tries to help her quit the habit…he takes her for a two week trip to the Adriondacks. He says he will marry her whne his divorce happens.  She moves in with him at his upper west side apartment.  But her ex-bf tracks her down and gets her hooked again.  Holman murders the guy with his own saxophone.

It wasn’t just the sex and the cover that people bought this book: there was the dark forbiddne underside of jazz hopheads, reefer madness, and shooting junk with shared needles (this was pre-AIDS, of course).

The cover is misleading. First, Helene is a blonde and the girl on the cover had dark hair…two, she does not shoot junk in front of him and the man on the cover is not jazzy beatnik enough to be the band members.

It was good to sit down and read the novel that started Nightstand/Greenlead and set off a series of events that have shaped the freedoms of what wrters can write, publishers can print, and readers can read.

Elliot- List Goddess

Elliot - Summertime Affair

Suburban Sin Club by David Challon and The Wife Traders by Loren Beauchamp (Robert Silverberg)

Posted in Loren Beauchamp, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Challon - Suburban Sin Club

Beauchamp - Wife Traders

Suburban Sin Club by Silverberg pen name David Challon was published in 1959 by Bedside Books, and reprinted in truncated form as The Wife Traders in 1962 by Boudoir Books, as a Loren Beauchamp novel.

Suburban Sin Club is 192 pages and Wife Traders 160, in a smaller digest form and larger type, with about 15,000 words edited out.  The edit seems to be have done for budget reasons, to get the book down to 160 pages.

The other Boudoirs I have seen are 144-160 pages, small trim in Nightstand-like digests.  Boudoir was a short lived imprint (1962-64) from Imperial Publishing, in Los Angeles, from American Art Enterprises, a company that issued out thousands of books in the 60s under many imprints, most of them reprints from a decade earlier.

The edits in Wife Traders mostly removes 2-3 pages from the end of chapters in Suburban, and taking out a lot of banter that is really padding for Silverberg to meet his page quota.

Raplh and Betty Holland are in their early 30s and have moved to the Long Island suburbs to get out of Manhattan.  Ralph works in publishing. They have two boys.  They move into an apartment/condo complex, Court K.  Seems Court K is a swingers haven, where each Saturday the denizens engage in the pick-a-key, get-that-wife game.

The two go for it.  They seem to be a little too easy in trying out the swinger lifestyle…and then Betty gets pregnant, and the father could be any one of eight men she has been sleeping with.

A morality tales — as with 1950s wages of sin, it all culminates in murder, suicide, tragedy, morals charges, and scandal.

A fun read.

Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks — The Coolness of the Past

Posted in Uncategorized, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 19, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Holliday - Scars of List

Welcome this Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks Blog.  The purpose of this blog is to post some hot, cool paperback covers for the gaze of your eye sockets, and to review and discuss selected titles.

Most of the titles will be from Don Elliott, Lauren Beauchamp, David Challon, Mark Ryan  (all pen names of Robert Silverberg), Gerrold Watkins and Mel Johnson (pen names of Barry N. Malzberg), as “notes” toward the two monographs I am writing, one on Malzberg and one on Silverberg and his pen names.

(But I will discuss others too as I go along — Joan Ellis, March Hastings, Andrew Shaw [aka Lawrence Block and Donald Westlake], Don Bellmore, etc etc.]

I wanted to write a short monograph or essay on the Don Elliott/Laoren Beauchamp books, as they were/are of high quality, compared to many books of the time or even erotica today.  They also exhibit Silverberg’s early style. But I was uncertain where such an essay or book would find a home — best here on the net.

I have discussed Barry Malzber’s US-era Olympia Press titles under his name and Gerrold Watkins in a monograph, Barry N.  Malzberg: Beyond Science Fiction, Toward Psychoanalysis (Borgo Press) due out late 2009, but I do not have 3 of the Watkins and none of the Johnson (Midwood Books) that are hard to find…as I do locate them, I will post a blog here.

Beauchamp - Sin on WheelsDon't Ever Love MeCarnival GirlGang GirlsGang Girl

Kept - MidwoodLord - Badelliott - beatnik

Horizontal Woman

Abortionist

Instant Sex A

Challon - Suburban Sin Club

Immoral Wife/Henry’s Wife by Gordon Mitchell (Robert Silverberg Midwood Books)

Posted in Loren Beauchamp, Midbook Books, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , on July 18, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Rader - Immoral Wife

Mitchell -- Henry's Wife

This novel was originally published as Immoral Wife (Midwood 11) and then Henry’s Wife reprinted — keeping the same Paul Rader Cover.

Robert Silverberg only used the Gordon Mitchell pen name once, for this one, and it’s unknown why.  Perhaps because he had not yet established the Loren Beauchamp pen name there, with Love Nest, which was an unnumbered early Midwood.  At the time, Midwood was getting its books from the Scott Meredith Agency and had no idea that Loren Beauchamp and Gordon Mitchell were the same person, or that the same person was also Don Elliott at Nightsand and David Challon/Mark Ryan at Bedstand/Bedtime.

This is more a crime noir/suspense yarn than a sex book — there’s sex, but less so than other Midwoods or Beauchamps/Elliotts; there is more sexual tension, calling to mind a good James M. Cain novel, like Postman Always Rings Twice or Sinful Woman.

The setting is a small New Engalnd town, so small everyone knows everyone’s busienss and phone oprators listen to calls for giossip — any gossipy news is spread fast.  Hollister has returned to the small town after inheriting his parents’ home; he has been living in New York with his wife, Katherine, and their two children.  He met Katherine the day he came back from Korea, while in New York.

All the married women in town are ex-girlfriends of his, or he dated them…except for Jean, who is ten years younger (27) and lives nextdoor, married to Henry, a man twice her age.

Jean has been teasing and flaunting Hollister with her body, un til he can take it no more and cheats on his wife.  They have an affair all summer. Katherine finds out. He tries to call it off with Jean but Jean does not want to it to end — in fact, she wants him to leave his wife, she’ll leave Henry, and they can move to Los Angeles and have babies.  She wants children — he older husband is shooting blanks, and Hollister is obviously virile since he has sired two kids.

Hollister realizes that Jean is a nut-case and wants nothing of her. To get back at him, she claims he raped her, and Hollister becomes persona non grata in the small town community.

Henry finds out the truth: that his wife in an unfaithful floozy.  In front iof Hollister’s eyes, he shoots her with a .22 several times, then kills himself.

This was a good page turner, another worthy of reprinting, and I could see it as a good movie (maybe I will adapt some day). It is far better than some of the disappointing Beauchamps.

Greenleaf Classics House Style, c. 1969

Posted in Nightstand Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Sex Saucer People

Appropriated from Earl Kemp’s great e-zine, el. (If you’re into vintage sleaze, his memoirs are a must read of the times and people who wrote, edited, and published these books.)

Eliott - RogueNote that this is dated 1969 and states that “shock words” are okay to use, but not over-use.  By 69, court cases on censorship were allowing more dirty words in dirty books…ten, even seven, years before that, in the Nightstands and Midwoods and so on, from 1959-1963, you do not find any dirty words at all: “loins” for vaginas, breasts or bosoms rather than “tits” or “kncokers.”  In Silverberg’s “I was a Pornographer,” he notes that he qould freqently get a list of no-no words and terms from William Hamling and his editors, based on current court cases and what the cops were arresting for in the obscenity scare,  at one time forbidding the use of “give it to me,” which he found riduloulous so wrote a book with “give it to me” on almost very page (I think this was Roadhouse Girl, which I have yet to read and discuss, but soon..)

The writers out there will note that book length requirements were different back then than now — 47K to 67K words…today, most commercial publishers, even those that print erotica, do not want anything under 80K words (c. 300-325 manuscripts pages, coming out to printed books of 250-270 pages).  Harlequin still likes books in the 50-60K range (for those 192 page books); when I wrote for Blue Moon, my books ranged anywhere from a short 30K words to a normal 80K words, but average about 60K.  They never said otherwise; they never said anything was taboo, really, except “illegal” matters like rape and pedophilia and beastiality (more zoning laws in NY City when it came to obcenity than anything else).

In the meantime, for a blast from the past, I give you the…

HOUSE STYLE MANUAL
GREENLEAF CLASSICS, INC.
GUIDE FOR AUTHORS

Compiled and Edited by
PETER V. COOPER
Editor in Chief
Greenleaf Classics, Inc.
San Diego, California

Version dated 06-09-1969

#

I. MANUSCRIPT SPECIFICATIONS

A. Length: Regular adult novels & nonfiction-44,000 to 47,000 words;
Classics-50,000 and up;
Gay classics-63,000 to 66,000

B. Chaptering: Regular adult novels-exactly twelve, which may vary in length.
Other types-variable.
Chapters should be numbered, whether or not they bear titles. This matter should be centered at least six spaces above body copy.

C. Copy must be typewritten (pica or elite only), double-spaced on one side only of unlined 8- 1/2×11 white paper. (No erasable or corrasible bond, please.) Leave approximately 1-inch margins top, bottom and sides.

D. Use pencil only for corrections; ink markings hamper our editing process. Typing and page-numbering should be neat and accurate.

E. In fiction, we require strong emphasis on plot development and story ideas above all else, with a house taboo on irrelevant padding of any sort. The erotic content must be integral to characterization and story progression; it must be strong, meaningful and real.

In nonfiction (credentialed author or co-author preferred), we expect very specific case materials, with natural speech content, balanced by dignified scholarly commentary or narration.

F. We prefer sample chapter and outline, on new material only; we are not interested in examining old manuscripts. Report is within two weeks, and payment is on acceptance, with rate dependent on frequency of acceptance.

G. All submissions must be accompanied by sufficient return postage and self-addressed envelope. We assume no responsibility whatever for unsolicited manuscripts.

Ocean and LustII. STYLE GUIDE

A. Reference Works*

1. The American College Dictionary (ACD), C.L. Barnhart, Editor in Chief; Random House, 1963 to date.
2. 20,000 Words, Louis A. Leslie, McGraw-Hill, 1965.
3. The New Roget’s Thesaurus, Edited by Norman Lewis, Garden City Books, 1961.
4. Dictionary of American Slang, Wentworth and Flexner, Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1960.

*NOTE-These are standard reference volumes used in our editorial offices. We urge all authors to have copies of at least the first two, as our critiques may refer to information therein. 20,000 Words contains a section entitled “Punctuation Simplified” (pages 237-247), which is an invaluable guide.

B. Additional notes on punctuation and style

1. Brand Names: Avoid, otherwise watch spelling and caps, especially Coke (Coca-Cola), Jell-O, Levi’s (note apostrophe), Technicolor. But: diesel, quonset.

2. Capitalization: Generally, “down” style-a.m., p.m., summer, winter, etc.; the lieutenant (but Lieutenant Jones), the homicide division, the city, the state, the Taft building. If in doubt, check the ACD.

3. Commas and semicolons:
a. Read carefully pages 237-245 of 20,000 Words, with particular attention to the sections on apposition and nonrestrictive expressions.
b. In dialogue sequences, a comma must be used to separate attribution from following action (“Good-bye,” he said, and left), except in subordinate form (“Good-bye,” he said as he left).
c. Terms of address are always set off by commas, before and after.
“Henry, I wish you wouldn’t do that.”
“I asked you not to do that, dear.”
“Damn it, Henry, stop that right now!”

4. Dashes: Use two hyphens, no spacing in or around. (I think we-watch out!)
Indicates radical interruption: parenthetical interjection, midsentence thought shift, interrupted dialogue.

5. Ellipses: (…) Three dots only, no spacing in orAllison - playpussyaround. Indicates tapering off to silence, stuttering, breathy speech, pregnant pause.

6. Definitions: Know your meanings; be certain you mean what you say and vice versa. If in doubt, check the ACD. Especially watch fulsome, noisome, unique, and other such sneakies-strict definition use only. Do not use “oblivious to;” the correct form is “oblivious (forgetful) of.” Do not use “different than;” the correct form is “different (varying) from.”

7. Hyphenation: For general rules, see pg. 246, 20,000 Words. For special cases, check the attached word list. House rules: Good-looking (all-lookings), half-hearted, well-heeled, and all such “new meaning” combinations are hyphenated anywhere in sentence.

8. Italics: Use sparingly for word emphasis not given by context, for uncommon foreign words, for brief speechlike thoughts. Do not use for: “He said no.” “She said yes.”; nor for commonly borrowed foreign words (savoir faire, per se, fiancee, etc.); nor for long passages (three lines or more) of any sort. Always use for names of newspapers (the New York Times, the Gazette), magazines, books, ships, airplanes (but not for makes and models of ships, planes, autos): Lindbergh’s plane was called The Spirit of St. Louis. We flew on a Boeing 707.allison - for your sighs

9. Numbers: Small numbers (under 100) generally should be spelled out; larger ones may be written as numerals or spelled out, as writer prefers, but consistency must be maintained throughout the manuscript. (Particularly when stating times of day and characters’ ages). In dialogue, all numbers should be spelled out, as people do not speak in numerals. Note the following examples for general rules:
a. Three-thirty or 3:30; five-forty-five or 5:45; six o’clock or 6:00. Kill redundancies such as “at ten p.m. that night,” “at 12 midnight.”
b. A four-year-old, or a four-year-old boy, but four years old; a three-week vacation; but three weeks’ vacation.
c. One hundred forty-six (no and); Fifty-second Street (note caps); $5,000 (note comma).
d. Twenty dollars, but twenty-dollar bill; ten thousand dollars, but ten-thousand-dollar bills (unless there are ten bills of a grand each).
e. Height: Don’t use figures. Don’t abbreviate or use symbols for “inches” and “feet.”
f. Weight: Numerals or spelled out, but do not abbreviate the words “pounds” and “ounces.”

10. Possessives: In general, be sure you know the difference between possessives and plurals: possessives take apostrophes, plurals do not. (That is Mary’s book. Two Marys were invited to the party. This is my brother’s wife. Those are my sisters’ husbands.) Also watch the difference between possessives and contractions. (Whose book is that? I don’t know who’s at the door. That door is off its hinges. It’s about to fall down.) Our preference possessives ending in “s”: the boss’ daughter; Gonzales’ serape; the Joneses’ house (or, the Jones home); Willis’ wagon; but Bruce’s, Candace’s,Allison - Go Go SadistoDenise’s, etc.

11. Prefixes and Suffixes: “Half” is usually separate, except to form an adjective before a noun (note exceptions in word list). “Over” and “re” never take a hyphen unless necessary for clarity (okay are: overripe, reenter, reread, rework). “Ex”, “pseudo”, “quasi”, “self”, and “ultra” always take hyphens, “non” usually does; “like” usually needs no hyphen, “maker” usually does. (ex-husband, pseudo-intellectual, quasi-literate, self-esteem, ultra-modern, non-American, apelike, movie-maker) Also watch “ally” suffixes on such words as: accidentally, frantically, incidentally. When in doubt, check word list and ACD.

12. Quotes: Don’t use singles except inside doubles; for so-called effect, it’s: her “cousin” was, in fact, her lover. Punctuation goes outside quotation marks with one-word quotes only; two words or more, inside; of course, this does not apply to one-word comments in dialogue.

13. Spelled Sounds: Do not go to ridiculous extremes. In general, use these forms: aargh (pain); ah (one h), oh (one h); oh-oh (surprise); en? Hmm? Huh? Humph (doubt, scorn or indifference); mmm (delectation); uh-huh or mm-hmm (yes); uh-uh or unh-uh (no); uh (hesitation); psst, shh. Others, use your own judgment, but please don’t get carried away.

14. Spelling: See attached word list and the ACD. Always use American spellings, not British; color, favor, savor, etc.; caliber, fiber, luster, meager, somber, specter, theater, etc.; afterward, backward (one exception in word list), downward, forward, inward, outward, sideward, toward, upward; dialed, dialing, signaled, signaling, traveled, traveling, marveled, marveling, etc. (Usually, the “l” is doubled only when the emphasis falls on the last syllable, as in: propel, propelling.)Bellmore - Father in Lust

C. TABOO TERMS

Under current contemporary standards, adult fiction knows no restrictions as to word usage. However, please do not abuse this freedom of expression. There is no need to clutter up the manuscript with an overabundance of “shock words” in the narrative, simply to fill up space; use them only where appropriate. In fiction, we prefer use of slang terms to clinical terms in describing parts of the body and the actions in which they engage.

Do not use the following terms to describe anatomical parts (there is no need to be “cute” or evasive): his masculinity, his manhood, his avenger, her mammaries, her womanhood, her femininity.

To avoid tedious repetition of certain descriptive terms, refer to the Dictionary of American Slang or use your imagination-but again, don’t get too carried away.

Dexter - Sin VeltdD. PESTIFEROUS PAIRS

adverse: contrary; opposing in effect (seldom applied to persons)
averse: opposed; having an aversion

affect: (v.) to act on; to change; to impress; to influence
effect: (n.) result; (v.) to bring about

avert: turn aside (one’s eyes) or ward off (evil)
avoid: to keep away from, stay clear of, shun, evade

a while: a period of time
awhile: for a period of time

callous: (adj.) hardened; (v.) to become hard
callus: (n.) a hardened part of the skin

compose: to make up
comprise: to consist of; include

confidant: (n.) one in whom secrets are confided
confidante: (n.) feminine form of above word
confident: (adj.) certain, self-assured

discreet: prudent
discrete: separate

eminent: noted, prominent
imminent: impending
immanent: inherent

hangar: for airplanes
hanger: for clothes

its: possessive
it’s: contraction of it is

lay, laid, laid (transitive) to place or put
lie, lay, lain (intransitive) recline

lustful: libidinous
lusty: hearty

raise, raised, raised: (transitive) to elevate, to lift, to rear children
rise, rose, risen: (intransitive) to go up

repulse: to push away
revulse: to revolt or sicken

tortuous: twisting or complex
torturous: agonizing

principal: (adj.) chief, main (n.) central figure, basic debt, director of a school
principle: (n. always) a rule

rack: as a verb, strain or torture
wrack: noun only, meaning wreckage (flotsam or jetsam)

sensual: inclined to gratification of the senses; voluptuous
sensuous: of or pertaining to the senses; perceived by or affecting the senses

Elliott - Sns of SeenaE. WORD FAT-a few common excessive forms to be reduced:

supposing = suppose (This is an imperative verb form: a sentence begun with it should end with a period.)

her own, his own = her, his (unless clarity compels)

excepting = except; off of = off; or from; a ways = a way

the both of them, or the two of them = both, they, or them

Go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go! = Go, do, go! (Three will suffice at any time for any word or sound being repeated as a chant, shout, etc.)

Excess repetition of that girl, the man, the blonde, etc., once the characters’ names are known to the reader

Excess repetition of characters’ full names (except for special emphasis)

Excess use of bare, nude, naked, etc., once the condition is obvious, or as in: “He reached inside her blouse and bra to touch her naked breast.” Or, after an undressing scene, the completely unnecessary statements: “Then they were naked,” “Then he was as bare as she was,” etc.

Totally unnecessary use of “a pair of,” “two”, “both”, “Twin”, etc., in reference to breasts, arms, legs, buttocks, etc.

Unnecessary use of “of her” and “of him” to show possession, as in: “The breathtaking loveliness of her,” “the strength of him.” Should be: “her breathtaking loveliness,” “his strength,” etc.

Elliott  Carnal CageIII. WORD LIST

Compiled by our editors from notes on most frequently misspelled words in manuscripts. (Asterisks denote departure from ACD form, indicating house preferences.) For all words not listed, use the first form given in the ACD.

abdomen
accommodate
acknowledgment, acknowledgeable, acknowledging
acquaintance
advertise, advertisement, advertiser, advertising
aggressor, aggressive
aerial
afterward
air-condition (er, ed, ing)
airline*
all right (never alright)
any more (never anymore)
any place (always)
any time (always
ash tray
attendant
aureole
baby-sitter*
backward (direction)
backwards (in reverse order)*
ballpoint pen*
barbecue
beeline
blond (masc., noun & adj.)
blonde (fem., noun & adj.)
blue jeans
bourbon (no cap)
bourgeois
boy friend
brand-new
brassiere (bra is okay)
brief-case* (but attaché case)
cab driver
cafe (no accent)*
camouflage  Shaw - Corrupted
Canadian whisky (no e)
caress
cave man (n.), cave-man (adj.)
cellmate*
chaise longue (but lounge chair)
cheekbone* (but collar bone, etc.)
Chris-Craft
coiffeur (hair stylist)
coiffure (hairdo; coiffed, adj.)
coolly
cross-eyed (but cockeyed)
Chevy
cross-town (all forms)
damn, damned, damn it, damnedest
daytime
defense
desirable
desperate
diesel* (no cap)
dinner time, lunch time, supper time
discreetly (prudently)
discretely (separately)
disheveled
disk
double-cross (verb)
double-crosser, double-crossing
double cross (noun only)
drug store
dumfounded (no b)
ear lobe
ecstasy
embarrass (ed, ing, ment)
everyday (adj. only)
exaggerate
exhilarated
existence
fierce
fiery (never firey)
fingertip*Shaw - Tramp
focus, focused, focusing
G-string*
garter belt
guage (estimate-never gage)
gouge (to scoop out)
girl friend
glamorous (but glamour)
goddamn, goddamn it, goddamnedest*
good-bye*
good night (but good-night kiss; said their good-nights)Shaw - Tramp 2
good will (n.), good-will (adj.)
goosepimples*, gooseflesh*
half-day, half-dollar, half-hour, half-mile (but half an hour, etc.)
half slip
halfway (adj. & adv.)
half-wit
hangover* (but hung-over)
harass
hardhead (n.), hard-headed (adj.)
hard-top
hatbox
headwaiter
heartache
heartbreak (all forms)
hi-fi
hitchhike
hors d’oeuvres
idiosyncrasy
indefinable
inside out (hyphenate before a noun)
insistent
intern (n.), interne (f.)
irresistible
jack hammer
jackknife (n. & v.), jackknifed
jeopardyElliott - Decadent
judging, judgment
Juggernaut (note cap)
kidnaped (one p, all forms)
knowledgeable
languor, languorous
lascivious
leisure
Lesbian, Lesbianism (always cap)*
Lez, Lezzie (never use Les, Lessie)
leveled (one l, all forms)
libidos (pl.)
lieutenant (cap only before or as a name)
living room
loathe, loathsome
loveliness
lovemaking (no hyphen)
love play
lovesick
ludicrous
luster, lustrous
ma’am or madame (polite term of address)*
madam (one who runs a house, not a home)
machine gun (n.), machine-gun (adj. & v.)
machine-gunned, machine-gunner
make-up (all forms except verb), ditto made-up
mealtimeElliott - Untamed
mid-air
midsection*
mid-town
murmur
mustache (never mou–)
nearby (adj. & adv.)
Negro, Negroes
negligee (no accent)
night club, night spot
nickel (metal & coin)
nighttime
occur, occurrence, occurred, occurring
okay (never O.K.)
old-fashioned
paneled (one l, all forms)
panty girdle
paraphernalia
passed (verb form)
past (adj., adv., or prep.)
Peeping Tom (note caps)
per cent (but percentage)
persevere, perseverance
plainclothesman*
playroom
pickup (Elliott - Instructorn. & adj.), pick up (v.)
pile driver
pill box
point-blank
practice (all forms)
prestige
precede, preceded
proceed, proceeded
protuberant
recur, recurred, recurrent, etc.
redhead (n.), red-headed (adj.)
right side up (hyphenate before nouns)
schoolboy, schoolgirl, schoolteacher
scorch
Scotch whisky (no e)
seafood*
seize
separate (v. or adj.)
servant
setup (n.), set up (v.)
shined (polished), shone (gave light)
short wave (all forms)
sibilantElliott - Man Collector
siege
signaled (one l, all forms)
sledge hammer (n.), sledge-hammer (adj.)
smolder (no u)
solely
some place (never someplace)
soundproof, soundproofed
sports coat (jacket, shirt, car, etc.)
strip tease (but strip-teaser, -tease act)
superintendent
supersede
sweatshirt*
T-shirt*
temperament, temperamental
teen-age, teen-ager (always hyphenated)
tendency
terry cloth (n. & adj.)
theater
thrash (only farmers thresh)
titillate
tousle, tousled
toward
towhead (n.), tow-headed (adj.)
tranquil, tranquilizer, tranquillity
trench coat
trip hammer*
truck driver
TV (always caps, no periods or space)
unselfconscious (but self-conscious)
upside down (hyphenate before nouns)
vice president
weekend* (all forms)
will powerNightstand - Tormented
weird
whiskey (all except Scotch and Canadian)
wield
worshiped (one p, all forms)
worthwhile* (all forms)
wrist watch
yield
zigzag (all forms)

Motel Sex Club/The Wild Ones by Andrew Shaw (Lawrence Block)

Posted in Nightstand Books, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , on July 17, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Shaw - Motel Sex Club

A Lawrence Block-penned Adrew Shaw novel — has Block’s tell-tale clipped noir style. A fast read with short chapters that feels like Block wrote this in several days.

A prevelent theme in 60s sleaze is the sex club — suburban swappers, college sex clubs, wild teens — this is a wild teens sesx club.  A 17 year old girl runs the family motel outside Syracuse while her dad is away for the summer; she soon invites all her friends from college for partiesand sex romps, and sleeps with traveling salesmen and any other men who fancy her delight.

Motel guests sleep with each other, not knowing each other’s names — the set-ups are absurd and more like Debbie Does Dallas situations.

There are wild parties with pot, drifting into reefer madness.  The night they all drop LSD, things go nuts…well, in Motel Sex Club, 1960, it’s speed pills…in The Wild Ones, the 1973 reprint, it’s been updated to acid — the language is updated too: “tits” for breasts” and “fuck me” for “give it to me.”

Not Block’s best, not as good as Lust Damned.

Shaw - The Wild Ones