Archive for Boudoir Books

Case of the Eager Nymphs – Arnold Marmor (Boudoir #1044, 1962)

Posted in crime noir, noir fiction, pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , on April 20, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

The title of this Marmor is a take on the Perry Mason books, and the hero is  a lawyer, but he’s nothing like Mason and the title has little to do with the plotline.

Previously reviewed Marmor’s Love Addiction and found out that Marmor used his real name and was a veteran of the crime and SF pulp days of the 1950s, and a good read.

Case of the Eager Nymphs is a good read and reads more like a novella for, say, Mike Shayne’s Mystery Mag than a “sleaze” book.  It’s short, about 25-30,000 words, and moves briskly.  It’s narrated by a lawyer hired by a woman who is supposedly dead from a car crash and buried…the woman wants to find out whose body was substituted for hers, and who tried to have her killed — her ex-husbands (she has four) or her brother, all for wealthy inheritance.

There’s a lot of gum-shoeing around, petty and curious characters, a bit of sex, and some confusion about what’s going on, but it’s still worth a read.

Girls Afire by Jan Hudson (Boudoir #103)

Posted in pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 25, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Hudson - Hirls Afire

Jan Hudson was one of George H. Smith’s nom de plumes (his middle name Hudson) that he did a few books under, most notably the highly collectible Those Sexy Suacer People from Greenleaf Classics.

Smith also wrote many Nightstands as Don Bellmore, and some scince fiction titles.  His stuff tends to be comic, playful, and whacky, such as this one.

This is Boudoir #103.  The first, #101, was The Wife Traders by Loren Beauchamp, reviewed here in July. Boudoir was a short-lived imprint of Imperial Publishing aka American Art Enterprises, a shady Los Angeles outfit.

Girls Afire opens with protagonist Jeremy Fargo at a Venice Beach party that has been going on for three days.  People are drunk, high, having sex, reading poetry aloud — they’re all beatniks too, proto-hippies in L.A., and they see Jeremy as a “sqaure” but he’s there.

Jeremy is a frustrated novelist, once a Madison Avenue commercial artist, following his dream to be a, um, writer of great Ameican literature.  His first novel was published but the critics found it bleak and sales weren’t good, so his publisher has rejected his second novel and Jeremy doesn’t know what to do — maybe write a more commercial, upbeat novel?

He has left rainy San Francisco and move to sunny Los Angeles to write. He has rented a room out in a house. The landlady, a good looking woman whose husband is often away, suggests he might pay his rent in trade — that is, sex.  He thinks it might work.

At the party, he meets a girl named Deirdre and takes her home.  Deidre thinks he may be The One, even if he is a sqaure, but he is a writer.  She’s going with a friend of his but he convinces the friend to dump her, that she’s no good; his friend does, leaving a clear path for him.

Then he meets her sister, Jean, and falls in love with her.  As much as Jean tries to resist, she succumbs to Jeremy, much too Deirdre’s hurt and anger.

Giving in to his landlady’s reqest of sex for rent, the two are at it when her husband walks in and catches them — he wants to kill Jeremy, and so does Jeremy’s friend when the guy learns Jeremy took Deirdre as a lover, and now Deirdre wants to kill him for taking her sister.

So he has three people after his hide…

It’s funny and short.  It’s okay.  I’m not much into comic sleazecore. I prefer the serious and dark stuff.

Suburban Sin Club by David Challon and The Wife Traders by Loren Beauchamp (Robert Silverberg)

Posted in Loren Beauchamp, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Challon - Suburban Sin Club

Beauchamp - Wife Traders

Suburban Sin Club by Silverberg pen name David Challon was published in 1959 by Bedside Books, and reprinted in truncated form as The Wife Traders in 1962 by Boudoir Books, as a Loren Beauchamp novel.

Suburban Sin Club is 192 pages and Wife Traders 160, in a smaller digest form and larger type, with about 15,000 words edited out.  The edit seems to be have done for budget reasons, to get the book down to 160 pages.

The other Boudoirs I have seen are 144-160 pages, small trim in Nightstand-like digests.  Boudoir was a short lived imprint (1962-64) from Imperial Publishing, in Los Angeles, from American Art Enterprises, a company that issued out thousands of books in the 60s under many imprints, most of them reprints from a decade earlier.

The edits in Wife Traders mostly removes 2-3 pages from the end of chapters in Suburban, and taking out a lot of banter that is really padding for Silverberg to meet his page quota.

Raplh and Betty Holland are in their early 30s and have moved to the Long Island suburbs to get out of Manhattan.  Ralph works in publishing. They have two boys.  They move into an apartment/condo complex, Court K.  Seems Court K is a swingers haven, where each Saturday the denizens engage in the pick-a-key, get-that-wife game.

The two go for it.  They seem to be a little too easy in trying out the swinger lifestyle…and then Betty gets pregnant, and the father could be any one of eight men she has been sleeping with.

A morality tales — as with 1950s wages of sin, it all culminates in murder, suicide, tragedy, morals charges, and scandal.

A fun read.