Archive for smut

The Tides of Lust/Equinox by Samuel. R. Delany (Lancer Books, 1973; Masquetade Books, 1994)

Posted in pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , on February 27, 2011 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

This is Samuel R. Delany’s first pornographic novel, written between Nova and Dhalgren, the two SF novels where the sexual content broke the barriers of the genre and shocked and delighted critics and fans.

Delany wrote Equinox (the intended title) in September, 1968 with the intention of publishing it with Los Angeles-nased Essex House, a short-lived imprint of Milton Luros’ successful Brandon House,  that was issuing “literary erotica” from the likes of Charles Bukowki, Philip Jose Farmer, Michael Perkins, etc., at the quirky editorial hand of Brian Kirby (later of the Los Angeles Free Press).  Packaged as smut, smut readers did not buy these books well within that market and by the time Delany had his manuscript ready, Exxex House was kaput.

Delany didn’t find a publisher until 1973, with Lancer Books, which titled Equinox as The Tides of Lust. Lancer went out of business months later.

Delany write his second porn novel, Hogg, right after, and that one was not published until 1994 with Black Ice Books.

Because of his status as a major Sf writer, The Tides of Lust was reviewed by the mainstream media and met with favorable reviews, despite being ground-breaking in its sexual content with rape, S/M, sexual slavery and pedophillia.

Delany was not afraid to publish porn under his own name, as were other SF writers protective of their present and future careers.  Delany was a respected fiction writer and literary/cultural critic, so his publishing hardcore erotic works has always met with strong mixed reactions from fans and critics.

Delany is a lot like George Bataille in that sense: a serious thinker and word master who also explores the dark sexual side of the self and unafraid of public reaction.

Equinox/The Tides of Lust is not as fetish and graphic as Hogg of The Mad Man, Delany’s third porn novel, relying more on dialogue to describe the sexual activity, but it does have its “shocking” elements…

An unnamed African-American captain of a sailing yacht, the Equinox, travels the world with two sexual slaves, a 13 and 15 year old brother and sister whom he “purchased” six years ago to tend to all his sexual needs, and to please guests on board the boat.

When Richard Kasak reprinted the novel in 1994 through his Masquerade Books imprint, the publisher succumbed to the PC pressures against pedophile literature, yet mocking it: they added 100 years to all underage characters, hence the brother and sister sex slaves are 113 and 115.  Other minor characters are 106. (Kiddie porn is rampant in Hogg, the narrator is an 11 year old boy, the sex slave of a biker.)

When UK publisher Savoy House published The Tides of Lust, 2,000 copies were seized and destroyed by the British authorities and the publisher was jailed.

Is this a Transgressive Novel? It was at the time, and having read Delany’s other smut novels, Equinox is somewhat tame by comparison.

The structure is similar to The Einstein Intersection: chapters that start off with arcane quotes from various and wide-reaching sources.

Slavemaster’s Plaything by Jocelyn Ryder (Greenleaf Classics #1250, 1969)

Posted in pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , on July 27, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

In 1969, Greenleaf Classics (Hamling, Kemp, etc) published a fifty title series called Keyhole.  Each cover had a keyhole shape cut into it, and on the other side was a lurid illustration.

Slavemaster’s Plaything is #12 in the series, and behind the keyhole is a nubile nubian slave girl being whipped on a post.

This is a plantation story set in the south, with bad southern dialect in prose and horrible sex scenes.

A great idea for a series…an awful novel.

The problem, as I stated before with Midwood’s post 1966 books, was when the censorship laws went lax, the writing seemed to degrade.

Recommended: Abnormal Norma: Confessions of a Postmodern Slattern by Valerie Gray (Ophelia Press, 2010)

Posted in noir fiction, Orrie Hitt, pulp fiction with tags , , , , , on May 9, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Not to be confused with Orrie Hitt’s Abnormal Norma.

What if A Clockwork Orange had been written by a crazy gang girl instead of a boy?  This is the book.

It’s dedicated to Kathy Acker, and the influence shows.  Seems Gray was once a student of Acker’s at UCSD.

Get the paperback at Amazon or as Kindle.

Regular ebook from the publisher.

Recommeded: The Darling Babysitter by Sandra Boise (Ophelia Press, 2010)

Posted in pulp fiction with tags , , , , , , on May 7, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

A strange little novel about a young girl seduced into kinky stuff with the man she babysits for, and then her father finds out…

Get from Amazon in paperback or Kindle.

The Wayward Teenager – Sterling Hawkins (Dansk Blue/Illicit Library, 1972)

Posted in pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , on May 5, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

The wayward girl in this novel outdoes the sexuality of the lass in Orrie Hitt’s Wayward Girl. Mainly because this is a 1972 book where such explicit fiction no longer landed the publisher and writer in jail; and these books were written with a downscale market in mind.

Since Terry Southern’s Candy, the adventures of a newly sexually active girl were rope for plotlines.  In the case of this novel, the heroine of the story is 13-year-old Maxine, a seventh-grader in junior high who feels cursed by her large breasts, the breasts of an 19-year-old.  he books opens with her trying out for the lead part in a school play — the character is 13 and while Maxine is that age, the drama teacher awkwardly tells Maxine that she looks “too mature” for the part. Maxine knows what the teacher means.

Boys and men notice her in public, thinks she’s older, compliment her “rack.”  She feels like a “freak” and wishes she had small breasts like her friend.

One day a man around 25 — ancient, she thinks — talks her into his car on a pretense of finding and address.  He tells her she’s a hot “groovy chick” and talks her into taking some drugs and, drugged, Maxine allows herself to be deflowered in the man’s car.  She fights, some, but is also excited and curious.  It’s a strange experience for her, and she does not know if she liked or hated it.

The next is a 9th grader on a motorbike, and this time it isn’t so bad and she likes it…and so begins her adventures in sex, as she goes from man to boy to men of various ages.  All the time, she confides to her best friend, Trudy, a girl with tiny boobs, who has nothing good to say about men and boys.

Later, near the end, Trudy informs Maxine that she’s been in love with the big-breasted girl all along, and hen Maxine, at her tender age, and after many empty sex encounters, find tenderness and love in the lesbian arms of Trudy…

While no gem, The Wayward Teenager isn’t as bad as some of the crap published in the 1970s.  It is readable, but also serves as a good example of how sleaze lit changed as the court cases and U.S. culture and society’s attitude toward what was obscene in writing changed.

Dank Blue/Illicit Library published a lot of down market titles for the adult bookshops with cheesy b&w illustrated covers, often dealing in “risky” and “taboo” subject matter.  We will be looking at some others in the future.

Wayward Teenager might be hard to find in paperback, or expensive, but The Olympia Press has it available as an ebook and Kindle.

Mary Learns How by Anonymous (Pendulum Books, 1968)

Posted in pulp fiction, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , on March 18, 2010 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

Mary Learns How…Pendulum didn’t do the best books, and each novel seemed to have a bonus short story attached, maybe to get up page count…

We add this one in because the story of the publisher is a curious one …Pendulum was located in Atlanta, Georgia, and connected with the mob, producing porn reels and running adult movie theaters and whatnot.  Apparently the publisher/owner shot his CPA over a money disagreement sometime in the 1970s and went to prison for life…

For Your Reading Pleasure..

For centuries, the introduction of young, nubile girls into the mysteries of sex has held unparalleled interest for most men. Reflected in such major works as Lucian’s Dialogues and elsewhere, the literary expression of such interest has found its way into the literature of the Western world, though admittedly much of it on the level of sub rosa erotica.
The two selections included in this fine volume, Mary Learns How and Mandy’s Adventures, both deal with the defloration of a virgin and her subsequent acceptance, nay, eager participation in scenes of more and more outrageous sexuality. These books might well become of great interest to those among the professions who find in works of folk literature an expression of the secret longings, most savagely repressed desires. Only by bringing to light these previously suppressed works can we hope to reach a complete, thorough understanding of the strange, devious, but eternally fascinating workings of the human mind.
The story of Mary and of Mandy is not that of the girl next door.

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The Spread by Barry Malzberg (Belmont Tower, 1971)

Posted in Barry N. Malzberg, Orrie Hitt, pulp fiction, Robert Silverberg, Vintage Sleaze Paperbacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 8, 2009 by vintagesleazepaperbacks

The Spread

One of Malzberg’s least known books, it has had three editions: this 1971 Belmont Tower edition, a 1977 edition with an art cover, and a 1980 “price breaker” plain cover edtion from Leisure Books.

Malzberg - Spread 77

Malzberg - Spread 80 Leisure

A note on publisher history: Belmont was once an independent paperback house that specialized in faux sexology studies and popular culture, as well as second rate science-fiction and mysteries. They merged what was left of Midwood (Tower Publications) and became Belmont Tower, then later merged with Lancer Books and formed an inprint, leisure Books — not the same Leisure imprint from Greenleaf/Cornith.  Lesiure still exists today as Dorchester Publishing (which published a number of curious books by Linda DuBrieul), which supposedly still has the rights to all these old books, Lesire mainly publishers a popular horror line, romances, thrillers and westerns now.

The Spread is pure black comedy, and a nasty criticism of the sleaze rag era of the 60s-70s, the other half of the biz that went along with the books: nudie mags and newspapers under the guise of adults news and entertainment…

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